Going international! Meet the 13 most listened to Brazilian female rappers in the world

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Note from BW of Brazil: For anyone who happens to catch the ”Brazil bug”, sooner or later the music coming out the country will surely catch your attention. Whenever a non-Brazilian is introduced to Brazilian Music, surely they will here some of the greatest, most well-known artists first. Names such Antonio Carlos Jobim, the recently departed João Gilberto, Gilberto Gil, Caetano Veloso, Chico Buarque, Gal Costa, Djavan, Milton Nascimento and many others. So of course, like other non-Brazilians, these are some of the first artists I got familiar with when I ‘discovered’ Brazil. 

But it was after this initial introduction that I really began to develop a taste for the artists that I really liked and the types of Brazilian music that I could live without. I remember back in 2006 when NPR radio released a story about Brazilian music called ”In Brazil, Even Bad Music Is Good”. I didn’t necessarily agree with this title as my visits to Brazilian sebos (used album and book stores) starting in the year 2000 most definitely introduced me some great music that one might not discover upon first knowledge of the country’s music, but I also learned about some of the horrible music. I mean, everybody is entitled to judge what type of music appeals to them. I personally can’t eff with Sertaneja music. Sorry. I just ain’t feelin’ it. And Sertaneja is EVERYWHERE!

I remember being at a party a few years back of one of the girls in my adopted family. There may have been about 40-50 people there, children, teens and adults. A typical party. Lots of salgados, lots of Coca-Cola, BBQ meat, etc. From one of the rooms, there was a DVD player connected to a set of speakers and the guy in charge of keeping the music bumpin’ would switch the DVDs every 15-20 minutes or so. Every DVD he loaded was of some Sertaneja group/singer. One of the guys sitting next to me know I wasn’t Brazilian so he asked me, “So, you like Sertaneja?” As I don’t like Sertaneja and it was blasting at that party, I didn’t hesitate to respond, “NÃO, não gosto!”, meaning ‘no, I don’t like it’. If I would have said what I was thinking, it would have been more like, I HATE THIS SHIT!!

Looking at the Wikipedia page about “Música Sertaneja”, I discovered this:

“Sertaneja music is a Brazilian music genre produced from the 1910s by urban, rural and other composers generically called ‘modas’ and ‘emboladas’ whose som da viola (acoustic guitar sound) is predominant. Sertaneja music is currently the most popular style of music in Brazil, surpassing even samba in most states of the country (especially São Paulo, Minas Gerais, Goias, Parana, Mato Grosso do Sul, Mato Grosso, Rondonia and Tocantins”

So, in fact, it’s not just my opinion. It IS currently Brazil’s top musical genre. So, what exactly does it sound like? Well, the best way I would describe it would be a sort of Pop-Country type style. The term sertanejo is derived from the term “sertão” which refers to Brazil’s rural backlands. Feel free to check it out if you choose, I’m just sayin’, it ain’t for me!

On the other hand, Música Black and Hip Hop has also carved out its own niche audience over the course of a few decades. Artists in these genres can’t compete in terms of record sales with Sertaneja, but these styles are much more to my liking. And nowadays, the genre that’s often called Música Black has given rise to what is now called Música Preta Brasileira (Black Brazilian Music), or MPB, a blackening of the acronym that for decades has meant Música Popular Brasileira (Brazilian Popular Music). Música Preta Brasileira and Hip Hop Brasileiro (Brazilian Hip Hop) both owe a nod to American Hip Hop as well as Black American Music, Soul, R&B and Funk, but with a feel that makes you think, even with the Portuguese lyrics, there’s a slightly different flavor here. These links were established way back in the 1970s when American Soul, R&B and Funk attracted a Brazilian audience and was celebrated in the mostly black periphery regions of large cities.   

Since the beginning of the 21st century, there have been a number of Brazilian Hip-Hoppers that have caught my eye, or better, my ear. Among those that I like are artists such as MV Bill, Racionais MCs, Rappin’ Hood, Marcelo D2, Slim Rimografia, Parteum and his group Mzuri Sana. Of the current school of rappers, I like Emicida, Crioulo, Kamau, Djonga, Baco Exu do Blues and Senzala Hi-Tech. I have to admit that I don’t listen to as much Hip Hop as I used to, but of what I’ve heard, these are the artists that I like. But, some of you must be thinking, where are the ladies?

Let’s be real. Like its American counterpart, Brazilian Hip Hop is also dominated by the men, but the ladies are there and have made great strides in gaining followings among rap fans. And not just in Brazil. Below is a short list of Brazilian female and one transgender that have been able to attract fans outside of Brazil’s borders. A few of these ladies have been featured in previous posts but if you’re not familiar with them, check ’em out!

Meet the 13 most listened to Brazilian female rappers in the World

By Vinicius Voutsinas

Deezer reveals the 13 most listened to Brazilian female rap artists on the platform worldwide.

On August 6, we celebrated Dia do Rap Nacional (National Rap Day) but we should also highlight the space that women have been conquering in the genre in recent years.

Deezer, the global streaming platform, took advantage of the date and gathered worldwide performance data from 13 of the top Brazilian female rappers in the last 12 months.

The data also show that the audience that listens most to the minas do rap (girls of rap) is between 18 and 35 years old, and the city of São Paulo is the one that most keeps up with women on the scene. Iran and France are the countries, after Brazil, that listen the most to Brazilian female rap on the platform.

Check out the Ranking below.

Tasha e Tracie Okereke

  1. Tasha and Tracie Okereke

The twin Gemini sisters are known as the “it girls” from the favela. Creators of the Expensive $hit movement, which promotes “the self-esteem of the young, black and favelada women”, they are also DJs of the São Paulo rap group CEIA ENT. Their most heard songs on the platform are ‘Pjl: Pelo Menos uma Vez’ and ‘Cachorra Kmikze’.

– Cities that most listen to them: São Paulo, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte and Brasilia

– Countries that listen to them the most: Brazil, Iran, South Africa, Italy and the USA.

Preta Rara

  1. Preta Rara

Joyce Ferreira, artistically known as Preta Rara, makes of rhymes her weapon. The rapper and art educator’s songs most heard on the platform are ‘Filha de Dandara’, ‘Falsa Abolição’, ‘Não Desiste’, ‘Negra Sim’ and ‘Cabelo Bom (Live)’. The audience that most embraces her cause is 26-35 years old (48.82%), followed by 18-25 years old (37.8%).

– Cities that most listen to her: Sao Paulo, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte and Brasilia

– Countries that most listen to her: Brazil, France, Japan and the USA.

MC Soffia

  1. MC Soffia

At the age of 15, she creates music to break paradigms and prejudices, especially those concerning machismo and racism. Among the lyrics that praise women and self-love, her most listened tracks worldwide are ‘Money’, ‘Barbie Black’, ‘Menina Pretinha’, ‘Brincadeira de Menina’ and ‘Minha Rapunzel Tem Dread’. The age groups that most listen to her are between 18-25 years old (49.27%) and 26-35 years old (37.67%).

– Cities that listen to her most: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that most listen to her: Brazil, Iran, USA, France and Portugal.

Mariana Mello

  1. Mariana Mello

Girl power ostentation: Mariana made her presence in the music genre by recording her first music video (‘Universo em Crise’). ‘Poetisas no Topo’ is the streaming champion, followed by ‘Quem Te Viu Passar’, ‘Recato’, ‘Da Onde Eu Vim’ and ‘Universo em Crise’. Her majority audience (60.87%) is 18-25 years old.

– Cities that listen to her most: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that most listen to her: Brazil, Iran, USA, France and Portugal.

Bivolt

  1. Bivolt

Bárbara, better known as Bivolt, began her career in MC battles in São Paulo’s state capital and has since sought to show that women don’t fit the stereotypes created by men – especially in rap. Her top most listened to songs are proof of this: ‘Poetisas no Topo’, ‘Eu Avisei’, ‘Vista Loka’, ‘Música Vai Transmitir’ and ‘Olha pra Mim’. The audience that listens to her most (61.24%) is between 18 and 25 years old.

– Cities that listen to her most: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that listen to her the most: Brazil, Iran, USA, Portugal and France.

Tássia Reis

  1. Tássia Reis

This Paulista (native of São Paulo) is on fire: not only did she just return from her first international tour but she also released the album Próspera, which brings discussions about black feminism between mentions of Beyoncé and Shonda Rhimes. No wonder ‘Vício, Shonda’ is her most listened to song. Close behind are ‘Sinfonia da Revolução’, ‘No Seu Radinho’ and ‘Ouça-Me R M X’. The people who most listen to the rapper are between 18-25 years old (48.25%) and 26-35 years old (40.76%).

– Cities that most listen to her music: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that most listen to her: Brazil, Iran, USA, France and Portugal.

Linn da Quebrada

  1. Linn da Quebrada

The transvestite singer is an activist on the rights of LGBTQ + and the black population in Brazil. ‘Coytada’, ‘Necomancia’, ‘Bixa Preta’, ‘mEnorme’ and ‘Bomba pra Caralho’ are the songs that get the crowds most hyped respectively – especially those aged 18 to 25, which make up 60.24% of the artist’s audience on the platform.

– Cities that listen to her most: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that most listen to the rapper are: Brazil, France, Iran, Portugal and Germany.

Clara Lima

  1. Clara Lima

Like the twins Tasha and Tracie, Clara Lima is also part of the São Paulo collective CEIA ENT. Her most frequent successes on the platform in order are: ‘Poetas no Topo 3.1: Prólogo’, ‘Inimigos’, ‘Último Dia’, ‘Máximo do Máximo’ and ‘Filha do Sol’. The age bracket of the people who most hear her music (61.66%) is 18 to 25 years.

– Cities that most listen to her music: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that listen to her the most are: Brazil, Iran, USA, Portugal and France.

Drik Barbosa

  1. Drik Barbosa

One of the protagonists of the collective Laboratório Fantasma, Drik began composing music at age 14. Today, she is in the ranking of the most listened to Brazilian women rap artists in the world as she made the top 5. ‘Quem Tem Joga’, ‘Poetas no Topo 3.1: Prólogo’, ‘Língua dos Campeões’, ‘Poetisas no Topo’ and ‘Inconsequente’ are her most listened to songs. The majority of her audience is between 18 to 25 (55.44%) and 26 to 35 years (33.89%).

– Cities that most listen to her music: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that listen to her the most are: Brazil, Iran, USA, Portugal and France.

Flora Matos

  1. Flora Matos

Who has never caught themselves singing “Pretin, desse jeito cê me deixa louca” throw the first stone! The song led to Flora Matos’ breakout in 2014 and since then the muse has had one hit after another. ‘Paradoxo Mítico’, ‘Preta da Quebrada’, ‘Pretin’, ‘Como Faz’ and ‘Piloto’ are her most listened to songs. The people that most listen to her music are between 18 and 25 years old (57.42%) and 26 and 35 years old (33.9%).

– Cities that most listen to her music: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that most listen to her: Brazil, Iran, USA, France and Portugal.

Karol Conka

  1. Karol Conka

The most famous rapper on Instagram (with 1.4M followers) came on the scene in 2014 with ‘Tombei’ – which, incidentally, is the fifth most listened to song in the world by the singer. ‘Nossa Que Isso’, ‘Saudade’, ‘Todos os Olhos em Nóiz’ and ‘Kaça’ are her most listened to songs and her biggest fans are between 18 to 25 years old (50.72%) and 26 to 35 years old (37.52%).

– Cities that listen to her most: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that most listen to her: Brazil, Iran, USA, France and Portugal.

Negra Li

  1. Negra Li

One of the most traditional rappers on the list, Negra Li has already been featured with Chorão na saudosa ‘Não é Sério’, her third most heard song on the platform worldwide – with the acoustic version coming in fifth place. In first and second place respectively are ‘Favela Vive 3’ and ‘Poesia Acústica #7: Céu Azul’. Her fourth highest rated track is ‘Uma Dança’. The majority of her audience is divided into ages 18-25 (51.36%) and 26-35 years (33.02%).

– Cities that most listen to her music: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that most listen to her: Brazil, Iran, USA, France and Portugal.

Cynthia Luz

  1. Cynthia Luz

Finally, we’ve come to the top of our list of top female Brazilian rappers on Deezer: Cynthia Luz is a Deezer Next artist, an exclusive platform project that seeks to highlight early-stage artists with the potential to gain more space in different genres of the local scenery. She started out making homemade rap videos. She went after producers on her own and joined the MC Froid team after the rapper learned a little more about his work. Following the release of her debut album Do Caos ao Nirvana in late 2017, Cynthia has remained active and relevant in hip hop, frequently releasing singles. ‘Me Negaram Amor’, ‘Praia do Rosa (Acústico)’, ‘Ela Tá Que Tá’, ‘Eu Não Valho Nada (feat. Cynthia Luz) ‘and’ Olhares’ are the most listened to songs of the Minas Gerais native on the platform. Most of her audience (60.53%) is between 18 and 25 years old.

– Cities that most listen to her music: São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba and Recife.

– Countries that listen to her the most: Brazil, Iran, USA, Portugal and France.

With information from Portal Rap Mais

 

About Marques Travae 3201 Articles
Marques Travae. For more on the creator and editor of BLACK WOMEN OF BRAZIL, see the interview here.

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